24 May 2017
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Sea Tiger:
This 168-foot vessel was sunk in 1999 as an artificial reef. Marine li...
 
 
 
 
 
 

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HAWAIIscubadiving.com: Messages

Take a look at the messages of member hawaiiscubadiving. You can visit the corresponding dive site by clicking at the link or take a look at each message by clicking 'view'.




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Hawaii > Sea Tiger > This 168-foot vessel was sunk  > [View]

This 168-foot vessel was sunk in 1999 as an artificial reef. Marine life and growth is still in the early stages. This wreck offers penetration through its cargo holds, passageways and stairwells surrounding the outer portion of the ship. Exploration of the inner cabins and passageways is restricted by means of welded barriers. The Sea Tiger is visited daily by Atlantis Submarines. For added safety, it is highly recommended that divers stay clear of the submarine and pay particular attention when transiting between the surface and the wreck. Although this wreck is relatively new, it has already attracted numerous species of fish including, squirrelfish and filefish, along with visits from morays and occasional reef sharks.

Hawaii > Corsair > The pilot of this Corsair ran  > [View]

The pilot of this Corsair ran out of fuel on a training mission in 1946 and ditched his aircraft. Luckily for us it was on a perfectly calm day and had created one of the islands original wrecks. It settled intact in 107 feet of water. The white sand bottom reflects plenty of light in waters that have rarely less than 100 feet of visibility. With the tips of its blades bent back from the impact, the propeller settled into the sand up to its shaft, while the aft landing hook and taxi wheel is still fully exposed, encrusted with a brilliant orange sponge. The port wing is buried almost to the fuselage, but the starboard one remains accessible to the marine community. A large Antler Coral has established itself just behind the open cockpit, with schools of tropicals swimming the oasis amidst an oceanic desert. Green sea turtles, reef sharks and eagle rays also visit this artificial reef for shelter and to seek food. Besides the depth, the main drawback is the strong current that picks up within three hours of the tidal shift.