19 October 2017
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Windmill Beach:
Windmill Beach is a popular training site for new divers as it is usua...
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Score
19.7
Indigo Scuba Deon Jonker
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NAUI
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Indigo Scuba Deon Jonker: Messages

Take a look at the messages of member indigoscuba. You can visit the corresponding dive site by clicking at the link or take a look at each message by clicking 'view'.




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South Africa > Windmill Beach > Windmill Beach is a popular tr > [View]

Windmill Beach is a popular training site for new divers as it is usually very calm and sheltered. As it is quite shallow, there can be a bit of a surge on the seaward side of the rocks.

What to look out for: Search the nooks and crannies amongst the rocks and you might come across pieces of old porcelain from one of the many wrecks in False Bay. Spider crabs are camouflaged between the kelp and red and green seaweed and you can spot many orange and black sea cucumbers,frilled and gas flame nudibranchs on the boulders as well as shy sharks and pyjama sharks hiding in the small gullies. Quite a lot of juvenile fish on this dive too. There is also a nice kelp forest to swim through where you can spot feather stars, brittle stars and colourful sea urchins and anemones.

South Africa > SAS Pietermaritzburg > The Pietermaritzburg (fondly k > [View]

The Pietermaritzburg (fondly known by divers as "The PMB)" was formerly known as the HMS Pelorus. She was built in Scotland as a minesweeper for the Royal Navy and launched in June 1943. During World War 2, she was assigned to escort convoys in the Atlantic and lead the D-Day invasion of Normandy in 1944. HMS Pelorus was sold to the South African navy in 1947 and renamed the SAS Pietermaritzburg. After seeing active service (her final being used as a naval barracks in Simon's Town harbour), she was scuttled in 1994 to form an artificial reef. She lies in an area quite open to the currents and broke into three pieces during a storm a few years ago. The parts are close together and still recognisable. The PMB is covered with colourful marine life which includes anemones, sea urchins and soft corals. There are also quite a lot of Red Roman that have made this wreck their home.

South Africa > Spaniard Rock > A short but quite steep climb  > [View]

A short but quite steep climb is required down to the entry point of Spaniard Rock. It can be quite surgey when a swell is running in the bay, so dive here when the sea is calm. After entering the water, swim for about 80 metres in the direction of the large rock and descend. Be amazed by beautiful, brightly coloured orange and red sponges for which the site is named. Many fish including Red Roman, Janbruin, Galjoen and Hottentot. Feather stars, soft corals, sea fans, colorful sea anemones and nudibranchs, pyjama shark and puffadder shy sharks.

South Africa > A Frame > One of the more popular dive a > [View]

One of the more popular dive areas. The entry of diving A Frame is quite easy (although can be very slippery, so watch out when the sea is a bit rough). This is a very nice dive site and great for night dives. You can spot huge variety of colourful plant and sea life here. Soft corals, sponges, sea anemones, loads of types of nudibranchs including blue and orange gas flame nudibranchs, brittle stars and feather stars Many overhangs and nooks and crannies to be investigated. We usually spot many fish such as Red Roman and Hottentot and lots of pyjama and shy sharks. Pipe fish, soles and rays can also found here if you look closely. There is a lovely swim through and a cave in the rock that gives the dive site its name.