21 November 2019
Home > divesites > member profile
 
 
 
List of diveshops!
Regional dive related shops can contact us for a listing.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Latest Messages

Yongala Wreck:
The S.S. YONGALA sank in a cyclone on the 23rd March 1911 and remained...
 
 
 
 
 
 

8f816ab2215e0c52b5bbd6a2acd4f39a62159356

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Score
8.35
yongaladive
Certification Level:
PADI
 
 
 
 
 
 
Custom Search
 
 
 
, if you would like to give Greatest Dive Sites permission, only by request, to upload dive items to your FaceBook account and visa versa.

yongaladive : Messages

Take a look at the messages of member yongaladive. You can visit the corresponding dive site by clicking at the link or take a look at each message by clicking 'view'.




, if you would like to give Greatest Dive Sites permission, only by request, to upload dive items to your FaceBook account and visa versa.



Australia > Yongala Wreck > The S.S. YONGALA sank in a cyc > [View]

The S.S. YONGALA sank in a cyclone on the 23rd March 1911 and remained undiscovered for almost 50 years, not being positively identified until 1958. The wreck now lies on its starboard side in 14-28 metres of water and at 109m long is the largest and most intact, historic shipwreck in Australian waters.

She sank just 12 nautical miles off the coast of Cape Bowling Green in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park with the loss of all 122 passengers. Exactly what happened we will never know – although research indicates the vessel was steaming, the fact no life rafts were found indicate the loss of the Yongala was sudden and tragic.

It has now become known as one of the world's top wreck dives and certainly one of Australia's best dive sites due to the prolific variety of marine life. Giant Queensland gropers hang beneath the stern while schools of trevally and cobia congregate around the depths of the wreck. Queenfish, barracuda, turtles, sea snakes, eagle rays and clown fish are just some of the other incredible life inhabiting the coral encrusted structure.

The Great Barrier Reef is the most bio-diverse ecosystem on the planet including over 1500 species of fish and 350 different types of coral. The Yongala wreck has now become an artificial reef with more varieties of coral growing on it than most natural reef systems. It is also host to a huge diversity of pelagic and reef species found in the Coral Sea. You will see more fish in one dive on the wreck than ten on the reef. It's certainly a dive experience you will never forget.